Horse Feathers – Appreciation 2018

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Portland-based band Horse Feathers have announced the release of their forthcoming album Appreciation, out May 4 via Kill Rock Stars. Justin Ringle has never been one to hide away the struggles he has faced in creating music. Following the release of Cynic’s New Year in 2012 there followed a long period of disillusionment during which he thought his career was over. Then in 2014, he surprised many with the release of So It Is With Us, an album on which he allowed the joy of making music to shape his songwriting. Four years on and life’s worries (those who are very conscious of advancing years will appreciate them) have naturally played their part in shaping his songwriting.

Despite the dark picture this may paint, the first single “Without Applause” is anything but. Ringle’s new rhythm section shows off their Northern Soul sensibilities to great effect in a swirl of Hammond organ, strings, and horns that leaves the listener filled with joy and warmth.

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On Appreciation, their sixth full-length and the fifth on venerable independent label Kill Rock Stars, the signifiers of the band are there: Lead singer Justin Ringle’s warm tenor and lyrics that speak of work, love, and other struggles. But on this album less of the song dynamics are achieved with strings and more with an exciting new rhythm section steeped in Northern Soul. Longtime violinist Nathan Crockett and keyboardist Dustin Dybvig provide continuity, but much of Appreciation feels like the best of Ringle’s previous musical ideas just took a giant step into a larger arena.

Recorded primarily in Kentucky (at La-La Land Studios in Louisville and Shangri-La Studios in Lexington), the new album features instrumentalists J. Tom Hnatow, Robby Cosenza and R&B vocalist Joslyn Hampton, who helped make Appreciation a mixture of strutting ‘70s-style country-pop and supple soul.

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Father John Misty – God’s Favourite Customer 2018

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Father John Misty will release God’s Favorite Customer, his fourth album worldwide on June 1st, 2018 through Sub Pop, with the exception of Europe through Bella Union.

The 10 track effort features the previously released “Mr. Tillman,” along with highlights “Disappointing Diamonds Are the Rarest of Them All” and “Just Dumb Enough to Try.” God’s Favorite Customer was produced by Tillman and recorded with Jonathan Rado, Dave Cerminara, and Trevor Spencer and was written largely in New York between Summer 2016 and Winter 2017.

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The Wynntown Marshalls – After All These Years 2017

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As the title “After All These Years” might suggest, this is a retrospective set marking Edinburgh’s ringing guitars Americana outfit’s ten years together, during which time The Wynntown Marshals have released three albums and assorted EPs as well as having gone through some line-up changes. They’re represented in this 16 track collection that, along with rarities and fan favourites, also includes three previously unreleased new numbers pointing to the road ahead.

It opens with the country rock Low Country Comedown with its thoughts of home and the life of a band on the road from their 2013 The Long Haul album, singer Keith Benzie dust-hoarse vocals recalling Miracle Legion’s Mark Mulcahy. That album also offers up the Byrdsian family-themed Canada, the quieter, more reflective Curtain Call with its tale of a magic trick gone wrong and the Neil Young influenced Tide.

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Debut album Westerner yields three numbers, the gently chugging pedal steel coloured Ballad of Jayne, the spare, slow-paced seven-minute Thunder In The Valley and the chirpier jangle of Snowflake with its Sweetheart of the Rodeo flavours.

Their most recent, critically acclaimed album was 2015’s The End of the Golden Age from which four tracks feature: Being Lazy, a brass warmed number from now departed bassist Murdoch Macleod, with its local landmark references and a dash of glockenspiel. The Gram Parsons influenced Red Clay Hill, with Hannah Elton-Wall from the Redlands Palomino Company on harmonies. The nautical-themed piano whale hunting ballad Moby Doll, and, of course, the jangling title track itself.

Although titled after the opening track of their self-titled 2007 EP debut, the number itself doesn’t figure, though you do get The Burning Blue, a song themed around WWII RAF pilots. Also from that EP is 11:15, a song about the storm and floods of 1829 that devastated farms from Inverness to Montrose that opens with rumbling drums before breaking out into the trademark chiming guitars.

Which leaves the new numbers, the first up being Your Time, guitar and organ underpinning a wistful song about an unequal relationship, followed, some tracks later, by the unrequited love of the yearning Odessa with its organ backing and a fine guitar solo. The final new track closes the album and is, in fact, a recording of Different Drug from the debut EP, the new line-up bringing a fuller, more relaxed sound with the addition of keyboards and more fluid guitar.

They don’t get the wider commercial acclaim they deserve but, as the sticker on the front of the sleeve says, they truly are “Europe’s best Americana band.” So, here’s to the next decade.

We highly recommend that you purchase this album .

The Delgados – Universal Audio 2004

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So last night i woke up at 02:43am and the first thing that came in to my head was The Delgados album ‘ Universal Audio ‘ What the fuck was all that about ? Any way i’am glad i it did , because i ventured down stairs and clattered about to pull if from my collection .

So in the CD player it goes headphones plugged in and coffee in hand i played it and instantly forgot how good this album was and clearly still is . It opens up with ‘ I Fought The Angels ‘ with a sparse and choppy guitar to start with and the amazing voice of Emma Pollock you get the feeling that its going to be dramatic .

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This is a more stripped down album that ‘Hate’ that i always thought was over produced but still clearly very good . Alun Woodward works well with Pollock on this album given the fact that there is less instruments to fight with . Girls of valour has a beach boys-esque running through the chorus while some other tracks like ‘bits of bone’ has a XTC vibe going through it .

Any way i still have no idea why the fuck i woke up with this on my mind and i aint digging around too much either to figure it out . so enjoy my album of the day .

Angus And Julia Stone – Snow 2017

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t’s been three years since Sydney-born siblings Angus And Julia Stone’s released their self-titled album. Snowis a welcome return to serene sounds which stay true to the minimalist production of previous endeavours.
The title track kicks things off with an oxymoronic, sunny tinge to its tone. Call and response vocal techniques trickle through the album and take precedent in the first track, exploring failing relationships, as well as moving on from them; “Looking at the stars, I have you to myself / Standing here with you and thinking of someone else. / Blanket on my back, I’m cold, I’m cold again. / Smile in the snow, tryna find something to say”.
“Chateau” comprises of a melodic backdrop which later develops into an ethereal display of vocal layering which echoes Bon Iver’s “Calgary”. Young romance is the driving force behind the song as Angus Stone coos “we can go to the Chateau Marmont and dance in the hotel room […] / I don’t mind if you wanna go anywhere / I’ll take you there.”

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“Nothing Else” takes us back to the duo’s acoustic roots, with smooth harmonies and saccharine lyrics to boot, while pop ballad “Who Do You Think You Are” offers an accompaniment of guitars with a country twang (similar to those from “Yellow Brick Road” off their second album), and the smooth sheen of “Sylvester Stallone” finishes the full-length with peace and polish.

Lead tracks “Snow” and “Chateau” may create the most groundswell, but don’t neglect the rest of the album – even if some tracks take a little longer to really sink into your earbuds. They’re well worth the wait.

Actual Wolf – Faded Days 2017

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Based in Oakland, CA, but born and raised in Minnesota’s Mesabi Iron Range – the same fertile region as Bob Dylan – indie folk-rocker Actual Wolf (Eric Pollard) shines brightly on his national debut Faded Days. Lush and expansive, it conjures the classic cosmic country albums of the past with it’s layered vocals and sweeping choruses. The album plays out like a vintage record store find, with a care to storytelling and payoff choruses that are in scarce supply these days.

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Album highlights include the Springsteen-esque “Be My Love,” which segues into the hazy vintage Neil Young & Crazy Horse vibe of the first single, “Baby Please.” “Little Runaway” is a classic rock radio cut (if you grew up in the ’70s, that is) and the wistful title track speaks of lost opportunities and old relationships, with the chorus asking “Can you still get high?” Dividing his days between music and being one of the leading extract/hash makers in the Northern California Bay Area (working for a boutique provider growing rare/hard-to-cultivate cannabis strains), Actual Wolf is the latest addition to the Red House Records’ artist roster. Actual Wolf has cultivated, cut and cured these songs with the same patience as that of a grower. The album is subtly informed by that breadth of different atmospheres as much as it is richly colored by the array of collaborators: Jeremy Hanson (Tapes ‘n Tapes, Tungsten), Jake Hanson (Gramma’s Boyfriend; 12 Rods; Alaska), Steve Garrington (Low, the Erik Berry Duo), Ditch Kurtz (a pedal steel guitarist from Nashville), with additional vocals by Al Church.

massive thank you to Red House Records .

Ducktails – Jersey Devil 2017

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Last summer, Matt Mondanile announced his departure from Real Estate to focus on his solo project as Ducktails. That renewed attention has led to the bedroom pop outfit’s latest full-length, Jersey Devil, due out October 6th via Mondanile’s own New Images.

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Ducktails’ sixth album overall and follow-up to 2015’s St. Catherine, Jersey Devil was recorded over two years before being mixed in Hoboken, New Jersey at Sonic Youth’s Echo Canyon studio with engineer Ernie Indradat. To help out with the production and recording, Mondanile called on producer/composer John Anderson (Sky Ferreira, Girls), who also contributed guitar, as welll as drummer John da Costa, South Korean bassist Chi Yoon Hae of Parasol, and backup singers Malcolm Perkins and Samira Winter.

British Sea Power – Let The Dancers Inherit The Party 2017

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Much loved indie group British sea power have returned with a collection of songs that showcase the strongest elements of their music, giving listeners space for contemplation while also bringing a healthy dose of high-energy rock.
Exquisitely crafted, the album’s introductory instrumental track is an extension of closer, “Alone Piano,” providing seamless repeated listens, but there’s plenty in the middle to love, too. Lead single “Bad Bohemian” is upbeat, with an ’80s influenced bass line, and Yan Wilkinson’s melancholic lyrics: “It’s sad now how the glass looks rather empty / The formulation of the elements makes you yearn.” Third track “What You’re Doing,” led by the softer vocals of Wilkinson’s brother, Hamilton, contrasts sharply, its warm drums and guitars bringing…

 

…wide-open spaces to mind as Hamilton brings a feeling of optimism to the song. It’s complemented by “Keep on Trying (Sechs Freunde),” an invigorating track with brilliant guitar interplay and a strong rhythm section.

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“Electrical Kittens” features Abi Fry’s beautiful violin playing, and feels like a quintessential British Sea Power song with its emotional intensity. “Praise for Whatever,” meanwhile, captures the band’s ability to pry bombast out of melancholy, as the drama grows from Yan’s first lines while the bass and guitars build. The lyrics perfectly express the world of contrasts we live in: “It’s such a convoluted hour / To play amongst the flowers / When we’re counting all the missiles down, from three to one to none.”

On Let the Dancers Inherit the Party, British Sea Power seek to express the confusion and despair — and, most importantly, the hope — felt during these trying times. Their music doesn’t shy away from the contradictions of life, and provides motivation to “keep on trying.”

Lift To Experience – The Texas Jerusalem Crossroads 2017 (remix)

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Well i said to myself that i wasn’t going to purchase this AMAZING album AGAIN , But guess what i ? i did . How could i not purchase this , it is one of the greatest albums ever made by three dudes that make you feel that you just been hit head on by a train of wonderful noise .

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The band set out to create a brand new mix of “The Texas-Jerusalem Crossroads” with engineer Matt Pence 15 years after its original release. The album was originally recorded live to tape, and Matt Pence was able to mix from those original recordings and capture the energy of the three musicians playing together in the room.
… If there was ever a case of an album being ‘ahead of its time’ this probably is it. Akin to Slint’s Spiderland in many ways, lift to experience ‘s the texas jerusalem crossroads came seemingly out of nowheresville middle-America (Denton, Texas in this case) and only made a small ripple at the time, the summer of 2001. The band disappeared shortly after, satisfied with their contribution (even if critically and commercially it wasn’t…

…an overwhelming success at the time) but also citing an interest in their solo careers – most notably, lead guitarist/vocalist Josh T. Pearson’s – and a changed world post-9/11. To date, last year’s appearance at Guy Garvey’s Meltdown Festival at the Royal Festival Hall remains their only live performance since.

It’s fascinating looking back on critics’ initial response to The Texas-Jerusalem Crossroads years later. In general, no one could deny the band’s ambition in taking on such a ‘big concept’ 90-minute record about the biblical end of the world taking place in Texas (rather than Jerusalem’s actual location in Israel), but there’s a resistance to those same religious allegories and questions Pearson mulls over this 90-minute epic, coupled with the band’s own meta-self-referential plot within the tale. For the uninitiated, The Texas-Jerusalem Crossroads begins with “the Angel of the Lord” appearing in front of the band one dark Texan night, prophesising the end of the world is coming and they must “lead the children of Israel to the Promise Land” which turns out to be in Texas. Across the next 90 minutes, Pearson wrestles with his specifically American-Christian struggles with forming a successful band with “a smash hit” as he negotiates with God himself in ‘Waiting’.

On that summary, it’s perhaps understandable that initial audiences weren’t really sure how seriously to take Lift to Experience’s debut (and only) full-length record. Were they actually speaking from a privileged religious point of view – the album certainly isn’t an outright criticism of Christianity – are they in fact as arrogant as they suggest in ‘These Are the Days’? – “So all you haircut bands, doing headstands/thinking you’ll turn the world upside down/Put your guitars up over your shoulders/A new sort of experience is taking over /’cos we’re simply the best band in the whole damn land/and Texas Is The Reason.” – is this meta-fictional narrative just simply pompous and pretentious?

Similarly, by the summer of 2001, musically, audiences would now be fairly used to the epic “post-rock” record. The beginning of this millennium was a pretty incredible time for music considering what was coming just around the corner. Bands who at the end of the previous century had posited themselves as outsiders prophesying, if not maybe the end of the world, certainly a catastrophic change to it, were already releasing big ‘statement’ albums – Godspeed You! Black Emperor’s Lift Yr. Skinny Fists…, Explosions in the Sky’s Those Who Tell the Truth… – while other already gloomy bands changed their established style post Y2K to point to the huge imminent technological changes, both in their music and what it means to us, on its way – Radiohead’s Kid A, Fugazi’s The Argument, Unwound’s Leaves Turn Inside You; however all these bands removed themselves from their art’s focus. While there is no way any of these artists knew exactly what was coming – which fellow Texans Explosions in the Sky found out the particularly hard way – there seemed a general trend in 2000 and 2001 that something was coming.

There are many comparisons to be made between then and now. At the beginning of the millennium, George W. Bush has been sworn in on a wave of right-wing populism after eight years of controversial liberalism, scaring everyone out of their late Nineties stupor into a decade defined by war which would carry on into the next presidency. If in 2001 The Texas-Jerusalem Crossroads risked being sanctimonious, 2017’s collective doom-mongering makes this album suddenly very relevant indeed – just when we thought white, American privilege couldn’t surprise us any further they go ahead and elect a fascist.

It also helps that we as an audience are now much more smart to Pearson’s intentions. Given his tremendous solo career in the subsequent time, we are familiar with his wry sense of humour and very real religious and spiritual considerations. Equally, we now live in a very changed world both socially (well, kind of) and musically 15 years on where meta-fictional concept double-albums – such as Fucked Up’s David Comes to Life – is now not such an alien concept in indie music.

Musically, The Texas-Jerusalem Crossroads speaks for itself. It is a tour-de-force in musicianship and songwriting, especially impressive for a three-piece. For 90 minutes, the world really does sound like its ending as this trio blast through sonic explosions on their respective instruments, move to delicate, reverb-soaked moments of sorrow and back again over the course of this double album. Another big reason for the record’s underrating at the time is the very valid argument of its sketchy production – hence the real reason for the re-mastering. While the original is still impressive, there often lacks a clarity between each member’s input and layering from the Cocteau Twins’ original mix, which thankfully has now been fixed by Matt Pence (Jens Lekman, Yuck, True Widow) so that the guitars shimmer, the bass rumbles and the drums explode.

With that in mind, along with America’s current climate, there is no reason why The Texas-Jerusalem Crossroads shouldn’t finally find its place in indie-rock music’s canon. It is a stunning singular work, hugely visual and symbolic like a great film or novel that highlighting individual tracks is kinda empty when it so clearly should be enjoyed as a whole. Let’s just hope the Angel of the Lord’s prophecies doesn’t come true.

Richmond Fontaine – Thirteen Cities 2016

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The complete Tucson sessions including seven extra tracks.
2007: the snap-pocket shirts, sideburns, literary leanings and pedal steels of alt-country are simply memories from the ’90s. Movement hero and harbinger Jeff Tweedy has led Wilco far from the decade-old roots rock rusticisms of Being There, finding purchase in experimental landscapes dotted with the detritus of modern living. Many have forgotten that Ryan Adams once fronted a marvelous alt-country band called Whiskeytown, as the bedheaded man-child jettisons off into the pop star stratosphere, bouncing from rock to pop to punk to country (again). Not so for Richmond Fontaine, who are led by archetypal old-school-styled alt-country hero Willy Vlautin.

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The intelligent and slightly shaggy Vlautin, who has published a successful novel (and whose voice contains the perfect blend of fragility and gravel for this type of fare), writes smart songs — poetic weepers that ride strains of deep twang and pedal steel and lash sweet pop melodicism to country intonations.

For their seventh album, Thirteen Cities, the Portland, OR band headed into the deserts of Tucson to work for the third time in a row with J.D. Foster, who is known for producing Calexico and Richard Buckner. Calexico pitch in significantly with horns on the euphoric, sprightly pop-country of the opener, “Moving Back Home #2.” Elsewhere, on the busily titled “$87 and a Guilty Conscience That Gets Worse the Longer I Go,” sweet cries of pedal steel trail the mini sketches of Vlautin’s narrator, who witnesses enough suffering and depravity (a near-death boxing match, a tractor-trailer crash, a teenage runaway in a sexual tryst) to spur him into the kind of deeply beautiful and downtrodden existential crisis that was once Tweedy’s stock-in-trade (e.g. “Far, Far Away” from Being There). By the time one gets to “Capsized,” whose down-by-luck narrator drifts, sells his possessions, and estranges himself from all palpable life, you begin to get the sense that the deeper Vlautin plunges his characters into despair, the brighter the twinkle of exultation in his eye. But all would be for naught if he didn’t breathe rare life into these literary tales with melodies that often take breathtaking little turns and swoops.

With Thirteen Cities, Richmond Fontaine employ varnished beauty to exceed the already high-water marks set by 2004’s Post to Wire and 2005’s The Fitzgerald.

Las Rosas -Everyone Gets Exactly What They Want 2017

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The Brooklyn trio las rosas have their roots in bands like Harlem and Wild Yaks, small combos that crackled with the vibrant energy of the best rock & roll with simple tunes, sharp hooks, spiky guitars and snotty attitude. Las Rosas take the best of those two bands and hone it to a fine point on their debut album, everyone gets exactly what they want The songs have the swagger and strut of classic ’60s garage rock, the rhythm section of bassist Jose Aybar and drummer Christopher Lauderdale are tight and action packed, and the sound of the record is immediate and loads of fun.
These factors would be enough to make the album a worthwhile addition to the garage rock continuum, but when the exploits of vocalist/ guitarist Jose Boyer are dropped on top like…

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…a cheerful cherry, things get even more impressive. His guitar playing is whip smart and razor sharp as he drops glorious riff after glorious riff, sounding like he’s done his homework for sure but never coming off like a copycat at all. His vocals are even better, slurring deliriously through the rockers, emoting like a stray cat on the ballad, always sounding weird and a little tipsy. There’s a little Ray Davies dandy drawl in the there, maybe a little Mick and Keith sass, but mostly he sounds like an idiosyncratic oddball and his style certainly helps Las Rosas stand out from the garage rock masses.

So do the memorable tunes that make up the album’s tracklist. Speaker rattling rave ups like “Ms. America” and “Black Cherry”share time with midtempo jangle poppers (“Moody”), rambling rockers like “5000 Hit” and the super catchy “Mr. Wrong” pair up perfectly with moody ballads (“Rose,” “Bad Universe.”) There’s not a weak song anywhere and just about any one picked at random would give a garage mixtape a boost of guts, energy and fun.

Los Rosas might not be reinventing the garage rock wheel on their debut album, that would be too much to ask. They do inject a sometimes tired form with lots of spunky energy, off-kilter charm and woozy personality though, and that plus the killer songs, make it an album well worth investigating.

The Shins – Heartworms 2017

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Rock has many artists who retain a consistent sound across projects. the shins ’ James Mercer is one, and the sound of his fifth album under that moniker retains all that’s good about The Shins, only slightly infused with tricks learnt from side projects like Broken Bells.
As the only remaining original member, perhaps it’s unsurprising. But what startles is the way the tracks contain the same sort of charm and warmth evident on 2001’s Oh, Inverted World. Mercer wrote the entire album, from the clomp of ‘Painting a Hole’ to the Christmastime Spector feel of Fantasy Island. He also took on production duties from Richard Swift.

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Despite being a male-heavy record, ‘Name for You’, the lead single, is billed as a call to arms for Mercer’s three daughters, another reason for……the gap between records, perhaps.

The strongest feeling is one of looking back. There are tales of school days, of learning guitar and Mildenhall is even named after the UK airbase he was raised in. Melancholy levels are high – but that’s a distraction, as beneath this motif is a wealth of songwriting nous that continues to set Mercer apart

Hurray For The Riff Raff – The Navigator 2017

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Well the arrival of the new Hurray For The Riff Raff “The Navigator” Four days before the release date has made me a little happy to say the least . This Bronx beauty really knows her shit an avid campaigner for woman’s rights and a avid believer in just do the right fucking thing .

Living In The City track opens up and you just know this is my track for the spring months ahead and possibly right in to the summer its powerful and upbeat with a vibe that will clearly lift you up .  I Am going to declare this a Siding With The Insane Stereo LAW  that each day should start with “Living In The City”

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I have been a huge fan of HFTRR since the self release “It Don’t Mean I Don’t Love You” and i knew from then that this band is going to do well , and everything after that release has always been ,solid and worth every listen .

Ryan Adams – Prisoner 2017

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As i sit here listening to the new arrival of the Ryan Adams album ” Prisoner” i cant help but notice and pick up on , that this album was written while struggling through a very public divorce and a rather fucked up one that could destroyed this man . But happy to say that the divorce has gave us a really superb album and a first of new songs since 2014 .

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Prisoner follows that remake of Taylor Swift that Adams does not look back on fondly as he has quoted in several interviews . This album opens up with “Do you still love me “and has a great punchy vibe going through it with some superb keyboards . I don’t want to go to much about this album other than just grab a copy of it when it gets released .

Album of The Day

Ezra Furman And The Harpoons  – Inside The Human Body 2008

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Well we have published our best songs of the year and our best albums of the year alongside Grievous Angel Promotions best of  the year list . So we are heading back to 2008 for a classic album by Ezra Furman & The Harpoons – Inside The Human Body .

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If Ezra Furman’s first album was his The Times They Are A-Changin’, his second is his Highway 61 Revisited. More amped up this time around and more band-oriented than before, instead of acting like an expansion to add flair to songs that Furman wrote on his acoustic, the Harpoons are an integral background component. Along with the band tightening and improving as musicians, Furman has also matured slightly. His yelp isn’t quite as untamed as it was on the first go, possibly because he’s gained control of pitch with practice, or perhaps because it doesn’t seem as outrageous in context with the more crazed numbers. “Big Deal” starts out with an infuriated spittle-infused scream “In a trance in France I learned to dance!” before exploding into a frenetic, Frank Black meets Stiff Little Fingers punk nuke. Yes, punk. The punky aesthetic that filled the lyrics of “Banging Down the Doors” (evident by the introductory line, “This song’s about a whore I knew in Chicago!”) has bled into the music on a few songs here, and with the tempo raised, Furman blazes through his lines like an auctioneer, squeaking out “They put me in a cage and they put me on-stage and they told me I could never go home/The government paid for a place in the shade and then my mouth began to foam” at a mile-a-minute pace. It’s a new angle showcasing the awkward adolescent turned aggressive anarchist, and the rockin’ numbers rock accordingly, proving that the Boston-bred boys can branch out and competently conquer other genres when they put their minds to it, even when tackling the antithesis of folk. But Furman is always at his best when he slows down and connects on an intimate level. “Springfield, IL,” “Weak Knees,” “The World Is Alive,” and especially the innocent Neil Young-ish chamber organ gem “If I Was a Baby” could have fit the earnestly enduring mold of his last album. A mature outing with the awkwardness subdued, all the boyish charm and lyrical finesse that made Ezra Furman & the Harpoons’ freshman Minty Fresh release a success is evident, and many of these timeless tunes could be classics if they ever made their way into the mainstream.

 

Grievous Angel Promotions{Best albums}

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Right you’ve had the tracks, the moments . here we have the novels some of which will stay with me others I’ll possibly forget but as of today these are the 10 best albums I’ve heard this year . 10 journeys , 10 unique experiences. So I’m all prepared to murder my darlings ….no Dexys, no Rufus ,but enough negatives in a particular order of which I’m sure will have significance only to me.

10 – De La Soul – And the  Anonymous Nobody

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9 – The Handsome Family – Unseen

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8 – Western Centuries – Weight of The World

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7 – William Tyler – Modern Country

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6 – Robert Ellis – Robert Ellis

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5 – Michael Kiwanuka – Love And Hate

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4 – Cale Tyson  – Careless soul

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3 – Peter Bruntnell – Nos Da Comrade

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2 – Richmond Fontaine  – You Can’t Go Back if There’s Nothing To Go Back To

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1 – Tribe Called Quest  – We Got It From Here … Thank You 4 Your Service

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needle points – feel young 2016

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This Philly based 6 piece band needle points came crashing in to “siding with the insane stereo” and made a massive impact with there own style of peace and psychedelia . released back in September 2016 on the back of a couple of e/p’s “feel young” was born and we cant help wonder how we all managed to get by without this .

Feel young opens up with “corazon” that punches right in the gut with that garage style sound and that guitar and bass riff that can only be danced to while on a drunk filled night . this is a fun song and is on a heavy repeat trip .

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This album has definitely made the top ten list of the year on “siding with the insane stereo” now we just gotta juggle who to move out of it . its an album to keep your shades on while listening its simply that cool . and if that wasn’t cool enough this album was produced by Dr. dog front man .

american football – american football 2016

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since american football called it a day after there first release self titled back in 1999 i always felt they they left us hanging and always thought that they had so much more to give us . none of the other bands in this math rock emo scene ever  came close to what american football presented us with . Even the projects headed up later by the band’s own Mike Kinsella weren’t able to fully recapture that elusive feeling.

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American football have still managed to keep that distinctive sound they had back on there first album only this time its a little richer . still the same sounding guitar and the same dry vocals . nothing makes me more happier than to see these back together and delivering a follow up album that should of happened years ago .