Califone – All My Friends Are Funeral Singers 2009

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So the other day i pulled this out from my collection only because i was sifting through it and thought ” shit i haven’t played these guys for what seems like years” So on the player it went and it still holds well ,

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I believe this is what Wilco would of sounded and developed into if they had the balls . if you haven’t came across these guys yet then i would highly recommend starting with this album . i know its not going to be everyone’s cup of tea but its a cup of tea that should be sipped .

 

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VA – C88 2017

 

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So yesterday i got my C88 box-set and like the previous Cherry Red Records collection that has been released i just knew it would be a superb release . this was the lead up to the pre baggy scene that took the U.K. with a right kick up the fucking arse that it needed. .

 

Following up their C87box set, which was the next step after their C86 box set, Cherry Red takes yet another step in documenting the U.K. indie pop scene with the 3-disc C88. It follows the fortunes of some of the bands from previous years who didn’t make the jump to major labels, tracks the influx of bands who were influenced by the jangling pop sounds of C-86, and generally provides an exhaustive view of the guitar groups sneaking around the edges of the late-’80s scene. Each disc is a mix of both names that have lasted through the years and complete unknowns; the compilers take great care to make the set one that even dedicated followers of indie pop will find full of surprises. For every Stone Roses or Vaselines track, there’s one by the Driscolls or the Church Grims.

 

For every indie pop classic like the Charlottes’ “Are You Happy Now?” or the Sea Urchins’ unbearably lovely “Please Rain Fall,” there’s a total obscurity that gives them a run for their money, like the Prayers’ “Sister Goodbye,” or “Village Green” by the Clouds. The big labels like Creation, Sarah, Rough Trade, and the Subway Organization are all represented with a few songs each, but mostly the tracks are sourced from tiny labels whose names have been lost to time  names like Whoosh, Bi-Joopiter, and Medium Cool don’t exactly resonate with the public at large, but the bands they contribute to the collection (Holidaymakers, Remember Fun, the Corn Dollies) show that there were plenty of good bands out there and plenty of savvy label owners to release their singles. Most of the collection focuses on sunny indie pop that was noisy, sweet, and as catchy as a summer cold (as typified by the Pooh Sticks, the Flatmates, and the Darling Buds), but there are detours into Lloyd Cole-style sophisticated singer/songwriter sounds (the Caretaker Race’s “Anywhere But Here”), angular post-punk drama (the Great Leap Forward’s “Who Works the Weather”), jaunty instrumental pop (Apple Boutique’s “The Ballad of Jet Harris”), a couple of frothy fun songs from the El Records stable (“The Camera Loves Me” by the Would-Be-Goods and “Curry Crazy” by Bad Dream Fancy Dress”), synth pop with trumpets (Pacific’s New Order-on-a-shoestring-budget “Barnoon Hill”), and tough and scrappy rockers like Rote Kapelle’s “Fire Escape.” They even dug up a rare demo from Pale Saints, “Colours and Shapes,” which shows they were a fine pop band before they discovered atmosphere.

 

These side trips help make the journey a fairly varied one, even within the pretty tight confines of the indie pop scene of 1988. It’s also a thoroughly enjoyable trip, whether you were there at the time and want to rediscover the glorious tunes of your long-ago youth, or a neophyte just getting into indie pop. Either way, there is a wealth of brilliant pop on C88 ripe for the picking, enough to keep anyone smart enough to check it out satisfied for a long time, or at least until C89 arrives.

Mojave 3 – spoon and rafter 2003

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Mojave 3 is a firm all time favourite here and a little bit of me always hopes that they return with more amazing music . Spoon and Rafter was released on 22 September 2003 in the UK, and a day later in the US. After the break up of Slowdive in 95 Neil Halstead formed the birth of Mojave 3 and released 5 amazing albums

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The Schramms – One Hundred Questions 2000

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Shaped from former members of Yo La Tengo, The Human Switchboard and Peter Stanfel’s Bottlecaps, The Schramms have been a Hoboken and New York fixture since 1985.

Finding a place in the sun both in the U.S. and in Europe, they have become one of rock’s most respected and talented bands.

Dave Schramm can also be heard as a featured guitarist on current works by Richard Buckner, Freedy Johnston, Soul Asylum, The Replacements and Whiskeytown.

This Album establishes the depth and sophistication of these veteran song crafters. This time, they’ve enlisted J.D. Foster to produce. This release is tight, and precise. The songs belong together and make for a flowing, detailed and intriguing work – like a book you cannot put down.

The band is joined by such luminaries as Richard Buckner, Syd Straw and Jeb Loy Nichols who all share in the vocals and the atmosphere.

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Lambchop – Awcmon 2003

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Well before i head off for another weekend off grid i thought i would share this album with you all . So i have uploaded a heap of Lambchop up to the ipod so you know ill be listening to the complete discography .

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Touted as “Nashville’s most fucked-up country band” by their label Merge Records, Lambchop was arguably the most consistently brilliant and unique American group to emerge during the 1990s. Their unclassifiable hybrid of country, soul, jazz, and avant-garde noise seemed at one time or another to drink from every conceivable tributary of contemporary music, its Baroque beauty all held together by the surreal lyrical wit and droll vocal presence of frontman Kurt Wagner. Although Lambchop’s ever-rotating roster would later expand to over a dozen members, the group formed in 1986 as a simple three-piece teaming Wagner, guitarist Jim Watkins, and bassist Marc Trovillion, former high school classmates already ten years removed from the educational system. Originally dubbed Posterchild, the trio made its earliest recordings in Trovillion’s bedroom, self-releasing a series of cassettes with titles like I’m Fucking Your Daughter. In time, the lineup began to grow and the band regularly performed live in and around the Nashville area, often at the area record shop, Lucy’s (not coincidentally owned by Wagner’s wife, Mary).

I Hope You’re Sitting Down (aka Jack’s Tulips) In 1992, Posterchild — now consisting of Wagner, Trovillion, guitarist Bill Killbrew, clarinetist Jonathan Marx, multi-instrumentalist Scott C. Chase, drummer Steve Goodhue, and percussionist Allen Lowery — released An Open Fresca + A Moist Towlette, a split single with friends Crop Circle Hoax. The 7″ brought the group to the attention of entertainment lawyer George Regis, who issued cease-and-desist orders on behalf of his clients, the noise pop band Poster Children. After rejecting the names REN, Pinnacles of Cream, and Turd Goes Back, the band settled on Lambchop, added vocalist/saxophonist Deanna Varagona, steel guitarist Paul Niehaus, and organist John Delworth, and signed to Merge to release the 1993 single “Nine.” Their debut LP, I Hope You’re Sitting Down (aka Jack’s Tulips), followed a year later. In many ways, this album would be the most conventional Lambchop record. Its Nashville origins and torch-and-twang ambience would saddle the band with the increasingly erroneous alt-country tag, although Wagner’s Lou Reed-like vocals and bizarre narrative conceits — in particular the fan-favorite “Soaky in the Pooper,” a vivid recounting of a bad LSD trip — immediately signaled their obvious distance from the likes of Uncle Tupelo or the Jayhawks.
How I Quit Smoking The lovely How I Quit Smoking appeared in 1996 (although on the subsequent “Cigaretiquette” single, Wagner would proudly announce, “I’m smoking again”). Recorded live the previous Independence Day, the Hank EP followed later in 1996. Marking the debut of drummer Paul Burch, the disc represented the apotheosis of Lambchop’s Billy Sherrill-inspired phase, its lush production evoking the Nashville sound so popular three decades earlier, but by then completely passé among Music City’s chart superstars. 1997’s Thriller proved a major turning point; highlighted by the Muscle Shoals soul of “Your Fucking Sunny Day” and including no fewer than three songs penned by East River Pipe’s F.M. Cornog, this sprawling, difficult album introduced the uncompromising eclecticism that would dominate Lambchop’s work from here on out. The follow-up, 1998’s What Another Man Spills, upped the ante further. On remarkably soulful covers of Curtis Mayfield’s “Love Song (Give Me Your Love)” and Frederick Knight’s “I’ve Been Lonely for So Long,” Wagner’s baritone drawl even gives way to a Prince-like falsetto. That same year, the group also backed Vic Chesnutt on his album The Salesman and Bernadette.
NixonLambchop’s fifth full-length, Nixon, appeared in the spring of 2000. Supposedly a concept album exploring the presidency of the infamous Tricky Dick, Wagner even included a bibliography in the liner notes — a direct connection to the Watergate scandal remains unidentified. Though still criminally unknown at home, Lambchop enjoyed a much more substantial following overseas, and on May 13, 2000 they appeared at the London Royal Festival Hall. The gig was recorded and made available at U.K. appearances that fall as the Queens Royal Trimma limited-edition EP. (A 2001 European tour yielded the Treasure Chest of the Enemy EP.) The 2001 collection Tools in the Dryer assembled many of Lambchop’s scattered singles, compilation tracks, and remixes.
Is a Woman After recording the purposefully spare Is a Woman in 2002, Wagner and company moved on to their most ambitious project yet — two simultaneously released albums, Aw C’Mon and No, You C’Mon, in which Lambchop returned to full power and joined by a lush string section. The next year, the musically experimental EP CoLAB came out, followed in the spring of 2006 by The Decline of Country & Western Civilization, Pt. 2: The Woodwind Years, an eclectic collection of tracks that had never appeared before on Lambchop records, including one new song, “Gettysburg Address,” and a record of all-new material called Damaged later that summer. 2008 saw the release of the typically graceful and elegant OH (Ohio), followed in early 2012 by the group’s 11th full-length outing, the austere Mr. M., which offered up 11 lush, string-laden meditations on love and loss, all of which were dedicated to the late Vic Chesnutt. In 2015, Kurt Wagner introduced his electronic side project HeCTA, and elements of HeCTA’s eclectic musical approach informed Lambchop’s next project. FLOTUS (which Wagner says stands for “For Love Often Turns Us Still”) was released in October 2016.

 

Elliott Smith – Either / Or Epanded Edition 2017

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About two minutes into either/or  opener “Speed Trials,” Elliott Smith’s seamlessly double-tracked lead vocal splits into a two-part harmony. It’s a very subtle gesture, and only lasts for a few seconds — but contrasted with the tight, hushed unison of Smith’s prior solo output, it feels as dramatic as The Wizard of Oz shifting from sepia to technicolor. This moment plays out like a microcosm of Either/Or at large, the sound of Smith conjuring something far bigger than himself and coming into his own as a songwriter, arranger, and performer.
The final album in Smith’s catalog before the major label-backed XO and Figure 8, Either/Or marks the last time Smith’s instincts would outpace the studio resources to execute them. It’s extraordinary how he embodies a magical, alchemical mix of……intimacy and bombast.

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By the time Either/Or was released in 1997, Smith was no stranger to the cynical machinations of the post-grunge major label gold rush. A year prior, his former band Heatmiser had been put through that very ringer, an experience captured in Either/Or standouts “Pictures of Me” and “Angeles.” Either/Or sounds like the work of somebody who has zero interest in either conforming to or directly transgressing the “commercial” sounds of the day. It’s too ambitious to read as “lo-fi” and too gritty to read as straightforward pop classicism. Thankfully, this 20th anniversary remaster doesn’t smooth out too many of those rough edges—if anything, it brings the unique sound of the record into even clearer focus.

The sounds and words of Either/Or often conjure very specific images, textures, and situations. And yet, Smith—as with many truly great songwriters—used this specificity as a way to explore emotional themes that resonate both deeply and broadly. Nowhere is this clearer than “Between the Bars,” the closest thing to a modern-day standard Smith ever wrote and covered by everyone from Metric to Madonna. It’s not a love song, exactly, and it’s not a song about addiction, exactly. “Between the Bars” is about the ways in which protecting somebody you love turns into the need to control that person. The fact that Smith was able to build this much emotional complexity into a song that sounds at home in a stadium or at a Starbucks speaks to his irreplaceable gift as a songwriter.

Elsewhere, Smith amplifies his well-honed songwriting chops with more fleshed-out arrangements. “Ballad of Big Nothing” propels itself forward with bubbly McCartney-esque bass lines and background vocals that sound like they might have been string arrangements if there were an orchestra handy. “Angeles” and “Cupid’s Trick” provide a back-to-back study in Smith’s versatility as a guitarist, going from intricate fingerpicked pattern to lopey electric riffs. By the time album closer “Say Yes” rolls around, it’s clear that the solo acoustic approach is a specific and purposeful choice, and no longer Smith’s default mode.

This reissue is framed as an “expanded” edition, and the bonus materials included fit the bill nicely. Rather than aiming for comprehensiveness or definitiveness, the bonus tracks provide interesting glimpses into Smith’s growing strength as a live solo performer (some excellent live recordings of album and non-album cuts), sense of humor (a sketch of New Moon track “New Monkey” that sounds like it was played on a baseball organ), and where he would go with his next record (a formative version of XO cut “Bottle Up and Explode!” that shows just how much thoughtful editing and revision went into the final version). And then there’s “I Figured You Out,” a longtime fan favorite that Smith gave to his friend Mary Lou Lord to record because it “sounds like the fuckin’ Eagles.” “I Figured You Out” would have been the most straightforward and polished song on Either/Or, and its omission speaks volumes about how determined Smith was to find his own voice and chart his own path.

In the years that followed the release of Either/Or, Smith managed to do just that, performing “Miss Misery” at the Academy Awards and releasing an uncompromising major label debut. For some of his fans, Either/Or marked the end of Smith’s career as a direct and intimate folk singer-songwriter. For others, Either/Or marked the beginning of Smith’s career as a one-man classic pop band. In truth, Either/Or marks the one moment in Smith’s career when he was truly both.

Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever- The French Press 2017

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Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever bit of a shite name for a band but who really cares because this band can make some superb music and with only two albums under there belt you can clearly hear that they are here for the long haul .

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Talk Tight was the bands first release and it is a thunderous album Listening to these seven tunes, you can easily trace a national lineage: the relentlessness of radio birdman , the pop literacy of the go betweens , the rambunctious energy of the easybeats , and the belief shared with courtney barnett that guitars are not just crucial to the message but might very well be the message themselves.

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French Press is the follow up from last years mini album release its due out march you need these in your life trust me .

Grandaddy – Last Place 2017 (PROMO)

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Well this morning just became “fucking” epic with the arrival of the new Grandaddy album “Last Place” . A massive thanks to Zach for sending this out, this is going to be so hard to beat, Grandaddy return with a brilliant album of just what you expect from them .

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Last Place, is the new album from Grandaddy: Jason Lyte (vocals, guitar, keyboards), Kevin Garcia (bass guitar), Aaron Burtch (drums), Jim Fairchild (guitar), and Tim Dreyden (keyboards). The band formed in Modesto, CA in 1992, and after four albums disbanded in 2006. Jason Lytle relocated to Montana, where he happily made two solo albums, and reconnected with the natural world around him. Eventually, though, life uprooted him again, taking him to Portland, Oregon until he eventually returned to his former home of Modesto. The return to California was practical (he needed to be near his bandmates) but also appropriate, as he had started writing songs that he felt would be fitting for another Grandaddy album. Following a second reunion tour in the summer of 2016, the band announced the new album would be released on Danger Mouse’s 30th Century Records along with releasing a video for the single, “Way We Won’t.”

Last Place, is a perfect addition to the band’s celebrated, critically-acclaimed catalogue, that includes their breakthrough sophomore album, Sophtware Slump, and their debut, Under the Western Freeway. It’s a symphonic swirl of lo-fi sonics and mile-high harmonies, found sounds and electronics-gone-awry mingling with perfect, power pop guitar tones. Lytle’s voice sounds as warm and intimate as ever, giving graceful levity to the doomsday narratives that have dominated the Grandaddy output. Last Place is written, performed, and produced by Jason Lytle.

best songs of 2016

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Well folks its that time of year when all the best of start to make a show so we thought we would put together a list of 20 songs that “siding with the insane stereo” have loved throughout the year .

20 – st Paul and the broken bones  – is it me

19 – blind pilot – packed powder

18 – needle points – Corazon

17 – yo la tengo – New York groove *not on spotify playlist

16 – M Ward – girl from Conejo valley

15 – Turin brakes – brighter than the dark

14 – Chris Bathgate – big ghost

13 – Margo price – hurtin /9on the bottle)

12 – Whitney – no woman

11 – Mount Moriah – calvander

10 – Justin peter Kinkel-Schuster – painting houses

9 – cool ghouls – days

8 – drive-by truckers – kinky hypocrite

7 – Bon Iver – 00000 million

6 – the avalanches – because i’m me

5 – Karl Blau – no regrets

4 – the goon sax – up to anything

3 – treetop flyers – 31 years

2 – the cave singers – that’s why

1 – Carter Sampson – take me home with you

All these tracks will appear on our spotify playlist apart from yo la tengo (17)and we will have a download link for you soon where  the yo la tengo track will appear .

also keep an eye open for our top ten album of the year .

 

mountaintop junkshop

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Hailing from Leicester UK mountaintop junkshop could easily be mistaken for the alt/country hipsters from some California scene .This four piece outfit recently play the hut at Corby on a support slot with Erin Rae and the meanwhile’s .

This is the second time i have seen these play and each time i witness this i cant help but think that these guys are on the cusp of making something happen for themselves . with there lo/fi, alt/country sound and two superb e/p’s under there belt “roman candles and red lights” and the superb three tracked e/p called “i dreamed i heard somebody singing in the outhouse “cameringo_20161103_211238

There is something about mountaintop junkshop that is dark and yet to be explored to its full potential , Amy and John’s harmonies together and clearly delivered with heart felt precision . yes its dark , yeas its down right fucking miserable . but these are the trade marks that give this lo/fi alt/country band the sound .

Every now and then a genre needs a kick up the arse because it becomes stale and boring . Mountaintop junkshop are that band to stick that boot in and challenge a genre so that it evolves.

you can buy mountaintop junkshop from the bandcamp website http://www.mountaintopjunkshop.bandcamp.com/music

honestly we really do recommend that you go and see these guys perform and purchase there e/p’s .